Barry Hill

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Oil Painting of Sunset - Barry Hill

Barry Hill    30x36ins. (approx 75x90cm)  Oil on Canvas                                                                 Sold

One of many prehistoric sites that has a strong presence to those who are interested in such things, Barry Hill has many intriguing aspects, one of which is that it is linked to Arthurian legend. “It's believed by many scholars that Queen Guinevere was imprisoned at Barry Hill, Alyth by the Pictish King Mordred.” ....I’m not sure how many scholars believe this at all, actually - but I’ll say that I do. Why not?

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This is the dew pond on the western edge of the fort. The first time I discovered this pond, I was walking respectfully round it wondering what it might have seen over the past 2000 years when there was a sudden great splash as though something large had jumped into the water. Something invisible too - because nothing was there to be seen, not even ripples on the water’s surface.

Completely mystified, I walked slowly towards the area where I though the noise had originated when there burst from the reeds at my feet, a tiny, soaking wet baby rabbit running full tilt whose eyes went like organ stops when he realised he was about to collide with the very source of his panic - my feet.

He ran even faster, did a complete circle around me and galloped back with another jump into the reeds. Not one of nature’s more elusive creatures, this young rabbit.

I hoped that the rest of his day was better and that he had a nice life. 

Not many hills have a large mouth emerging from them, breaking through the surface between worlds. A word to the unwary - don’t get too close.

This is a small cave on the northern edge

Big enough to shelter in if the weather turns.

Some of the prehistoric hut circles within the old walls

Not everything is as old as the fort itself though. This was probably a shelter built much later